Cholesterol reduction naturally with herbal medicine and healthy dietary choices
Home remedies and dietary supplements that work to reduce levels
Reduce cholesterol naturally and avoid the use of potentially dangerous prescription medications such as statin drugs
January 12 2017

Cholesterol reduction naturally with herbal medicine
Many doctors are told that in order for patients to reduce their risk for atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, aggressive reduction of cholesterol levels and normalization of high blood pressure is necessary. For this purpose doctors are told that prescription medications are necessary. Unfortunately, few doctors are aware that the proper use of dietary supplements can offer similar or better benefits with fewer side effects.

Alternative for high cholesterol herbs and vitamins for cholesterol and heart disease
There are several herbs and supplements that appear to help lower cholesterol levels or help prevent the oxidation of cholesterol that leads to damage to the inner lining of arteries.

Psyllium is an excellent fiber that also helps with improving symptoms of constipation. Half or one teaspoon in a glass of water twice daily with food. Psyllium is a fiber that reduces cholesterol levels and cardiac risk. Flax fiber is another good option.
Curcumin is a powerful antioxidant extracted from Turmeric.
Fish oils work well, especially in combination with garlic or other supplements.
Pectin Grapefruit, whether from apple or grapefruit, could be helpful to lower cholesterol. Also consider Modified Citrus Pectin supplement.
Krill oil is an alternative to fish oils. You can purchase Krill Oil Supplement here.
Beta glucan is worth evaluating for cholesterol management.
Artichoke leaf extract is beginning to be tested as a potential dietary supplement for the purposes of cholesterol level reduction.

Do you have a product that will provide a good supply of plant sterols and stanols? If not, what is the product that you recommend for helping to control cholesterol levels?
Diet, lifestyle and supplements should all be addressed at the same time to reduce cholesterol levels.

Diet and Cholesterol, role of food
A diet rich in fatty fish may protect the heart and blood vessels by reducing inflammation, according to researchers. The investigators found that individuals with the highest cell levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a type of omega-3 fatty acid found in fish such as salmon and mackerel, had lower levels of C-reactive protein in their blood. C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of blood vessel inflammation, is associated with risk of heart disease. In a study of nearly 28,000 women, levels CRP were more accurate than levels of “bad” cholesterol at predicting the risk of heart attack and other cardiovascular problems. see diet for info on the best foods to eat. Bulking up the diet with vegetables and legumes such as beans and peas can lower cholesterol and the risk of heart disease.

Diet and Cholesterol
Because most cholesterol is manufactured by the body itself, dietary sources of cholesterol (such as eggs) are not usually the most important problem. A diet rich in fatty fish may protect the heart and blood vessels by reducing inflammation. Water-soluble fiber supplements appear to lower cholesterol. Many forms are available, ranging from oat bran to psyllium. However, eating a diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains may be even better because of the many healthful nutrients present.

Eating frequency and Cholesterol
A person’s cholesterol levels may depend not only on what he or she eats, but also how often, according to UK researchers. They found that middle-aged and older adults who ate frequently throughout the day had lower “bad” cholesterol levels compared with those who tended to down one or two large meals per day. This was despite the fact that the frequent eaters, on average, had a higher calorie and fat intake.

Fats, also called lipids serve as a major source of fuel for the body’s metabolic processes. Fats are obtained from food or formed in the body, mostly in the liver, and can be stored in fat cells for future use. Fats are essential components of cell membranes, of the myelin sheaths that surround nerve cells, and of bile. The two major fats in the blood are cholesterol and triglyceride. The fats attach themselves to certain proteins so they can travel throughout the bloodstream; the combined fats and proteins are called lipoproteins. The major lipoproteins are chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Abnormal levels of fats circulating in the bloodstream, especially cholesterol, can lead to long-term problems. The risk of having atherosclerosis and coronary artery or carotid artery disease (and therefore the risk of having a heart attack or stroke) increases as a person’s total cholesterol level increases. Low cholesterol levels are therefore generally better than high ones, although extremely low cholesterol levels may not be healthy either. An ideal total cholesterol level is probably 140 to 200 milligrams of cholesterol per deciliter of blood (mg/dL). The risk of a heart attack more than doubles when the total cholesterol level approaches 300 mg/dL.

Natural Alternatives to Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs
Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of illness and death in the United States, accounting for approximately 500,000 fatalities per year and an associated annual illness cost of hundreds of billions of dollars. In the past three decades, numerous studies have shown repeatedly that an elevated blood cholesterol level is one of the major risk factors associated with the development of heart disease.Other risk factors such as cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes, also have been thought to cause heart disease. Although some cases of high blood cholesterol are related to genetics, most individuals can take an active role and reduce their blood levels of cholesterol through natural means.

Different types
Not all cholesterol increases the risk of heart disease. The cholesterol carried by LDL (the so-called bad cholesterol) increases the risk; the cholesterol carried by HDL (the so-called good cholesterol) lowers the risk and is beneficial. Ideally, LDL cholesterol levels should be below 120 mg/dL, and HDL cholesterol levels should be above 50 mg/dL. The HDL level should account for more than 25 percent of the total cholesterol. The total cholesterol level is less important as a risk factor for heart disease or strokes than the total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio. Whether high levels of triglycerides increase the risk of heart disease or strokes is uncertain. Blood levels of triglycerides above 250 mg/dL are considered abnormal, but high levels don’t appear to uniformly increase the risk of atherosclerosis or coronary artery disease. Also see info on APOE.

Medical Therapy for high Cholesterol
Without a doubt, statin drugs do lower cholesterol levels and reduce the rate of heart attacks.. But do they also reduce mortality? In a new trial the statin pravastatin (Pravachol) did not reduce the risk of death and heart disease in people with moderately high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Zocor is a prescription drug for patients. Rosuvastatin calcium is a pharmaceutical medication.

Atkins diet and cholesterol
A judge has dismissed the lawsuit filed by Jody Gorran from Florida who claims his cholesterol levels rose when he followed the diet in Dr. Atkins New Diet Revolution. Gorran claims that the rise in cholesterol levels caused coronary artery blockage that required angioplasty. Jody Gorran alleges that Dr. Atkins New Diet Revolution book is dangerous since it leads to dangerous cholesterol levels and should be required to carry a warning label. However, the judge ruled that the book’s contents were protected by the First Amendment (freedom of speech).

What is Cholesterol?
Fats serve as a major source of fuel for the body’s metabolic processes. Fats are obtained from food or formed in the body, mostly in the liver, and can be stored in fat cells for future use. Fats are essential components of cell membranes, of the myelin sheaths that surround nerve cells, and of bile.
The two major fats in the blood are cholesterol and triglyceride. The fats attach themselves to certain proteins so they can travel throughout the bloodstream; the combined fats and proteins are called lipoproteins. The major lipoproteins are chylomicrons, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL).
Abnormal levels of fats circulating in the bloodstream, especially cholesterol, can lead to long-term problems. The risk of having coronary artery or carotid artery disease (and therefore the risk of having a heart attack or stroke) increases as a person’s total cholesterol level increases. Low cholesterol levels are therefore generally better than high ones, although extremely low cholesterol levels may not be healthy either. An ideal total cholesterol level is probably 140 to 200 milligrams of cholesterol per deciliter of blood (mg/dL). The risk of a heart attack more than doubles when the total cholesterol level approaches 300 mg/dL. Cholesterol does not directly clog arteries like grease clogs pipes. The current theory is that elevated levels of cholesterol irritate the walls of blood vessels and cause them to undergo harmful inflammatory changes. It is also believed that antioxidants may prevent some of the damage to the inner lining of blood vessels caused by high levels of cholesterol.

Natural cholesterol treatment inquiries and anecdotes
Niacin controls my triglyceride and cholesterol problems extremely well.

Does yohimbe bark herbal extract influence levels of cholesterol, is this herb a natural therapy for high cholesterol?
This herb is not useful as a cholesterol reducing substance and is not recommended for those with heart disease.

i have just been to the dr. today. my total cholesterol was up from 220, 3 mths ago to 288. i told her that i use 1tbs coconut oil and sometimes coconut milk with my coffee daily. she told me to get off and just use topically. i have been trying to find on the net something negative about coconut oil, but haven’t been able too. has this happened to others for everything i read seems to bring down cholesterol levels not shoot them up?
Blood cholesterol levels can fluctuate on different days and weeks and the rest of the diet has a lot to do with it. It is difficult to say in your case, with only two levels tested, whether the coconut oil had anything to do with it. We suggest eating everything in moderation.

I read an article about the dangers of statin drugs for high cholesterol treatment. The current policy for most doctors who have patients presenting with high LDL cholesterol numbers over 160 is to prescribe statin drugs. What is not generally known is that there are two important fractions of LDL cholesterol. One is the small, high density, fraction and the other is the large, low density fraction. Since the LDL cholesterol number is a calculated one, which fraction you have the most of cannot be determined without fractionation. When the LDL cholesterol number is calculated the report states that the results are not valid if triglycerides are above 400. Research shows that the LDL results as calculated by formula are also not reliable if triglyceride levels are below 100 particularly if HDL cholesterol is over 60. The formula seems to be the most accurate for triglyceride levels between 100-200. Since most patients present with levels between 200-400, studies show that there could be an error of between 20-40%. My own case is a good example. My numbers are: total cholesterol 264, HDL 90, triglycerides 35, LDL164. My doctor prescribed Crestor to treat the high cholesterol level. Having had a background in Biology, Microbiology, and Chemistry, I decided to do some research on my own. I found several studies on LDL cholesterol fractionation involving patients with lipid profiles like mine and talked my doctor into writing a script for fractionation. I had it done at the local Mayo Clinic here in Scottsdale and they had to send it to Rochester to have the test done. Most labs do not do the test but one company has developed a proprietary procedure known as LIPOPrint. Long story short, the results showed that my LDL fraction consisted of the mostly large, low density, fraction. My doctor cancelled the Crestor prescription. My concern is that there may be a large number of patients taking statin drugs who may not need to since the large, low density, LDL cholesterol fraction poses no cardiovascular risk. The test is being offered more and more, is approved by the FDA, and is Medicare approved also. The test runs between 150-200 dollars and is quick. I don’t think the drug companies will be suggesting this test.

I read that men who eat a lot of eggs have a higher rate of heart disease and die sooner since eggs have a high amount of cholesterol.
It is difficult to pinpoint eggs as the sole cause. Also, it may depend on how the eggs are prepared, poached, made into omelets with cooking butter at high temperature. The butter cooked at high temperature could be harmful to the blood vessels. And many people who eat eggs also eat bacon. Would cage free eggs make a difference? There are too many variables associated with egg consumption. However, it is reasonable to limit egg consumption to half a dozen a week.

Sugars and starches are te problem,, not cholesterol. Normal cholesterol is 220-270. Eskimos have 350 to 500 levels and have no cardio problems as long as they stay on their native diet of high animal fats and no starches and sugars to speak of. As soon as they get on the Western diet, they fall apart. The military standard for cholesterol on flight physicals was less than 300 for years until they came out with statin drugs. Therein lies the problem,, drug sales.