Parkinson’s natural treatment and therapy with vitamins, herbs, supplements, diet, food
January 22 2017

Mucuna Pruriens has been tested for Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s Disease and diet
Eating foods rich in Vitamin E may help protect against Parkinson’s disease. A review of eight studies that looked into whether Vitamins C and E and beta carotene had an impact on the odds of developing Parkinson’s disease showed that a moderate intake of Vitamin E lowered the risk. Neither Vitamin C nor beta carotene seemed to have a protective effect. The researchers said they did not know whether Vitamin E supplements would have any benefits. Foods rich in Vitamin E include nuts, seeds, wheat germ, spinach and other green leafy vegetables.
If you plan to take vitamin E supplements, limit your dose to 200 units a few times a week. Vitamin E is fat soluble and stays in the body; therefore, daily intake is not needed. Also, use natural mixed Vitamin E complex rather than the synthetic dl-alpha tocopherol. It’s possible other supplements could be useful in Parkinson’s disease. Those with high intake of fresh fruits and vegetables have a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease.

Nutritional supplement use, vitamins, herbs
Q. Would a L Tyrosine supplement be helpful in for Parkinson’s disease?
A. L Tyrosine is not an effective supplement for those with Parkinson’s disease.

Q. I was wondering if my 82 year old mother could use the Mind Power Rx as she has Parkinson’s disease and is in the 3-4th stages of it. She seems to have good hearing but she is legally blind. She only takes med for Parkinsons and oxybutinin for bladder control. She seems to have trouble remembering what she sees on t.v. and has trouble with her thoughts sometimes.
A. If her doctor approves she can take half a capsule with breakfast for a week and thereafter perhaps every other day. We don’t have feedback regarding the interaction of Mind Power Rx with osybutinin and sometimes in older people unexpected side effects can occur when combining supplements and medications.

Q. My husband has Parkinson’s he currently is on no meds, however I have him on supplements, DHEA, iquity, NADH, vitamins, omega 3, coq10 1200mg. I was reading about mucuna pruriens, i ordered some. he has slight dementia which we are concerned over, also slow gait, drooling, can mucuna pill help his memory, as you see I have him on other memory products that should help, I also have him on a few other vitamns b sublingual and tremplex do not want to over dose him, however concerned over his memory he also gets depressed just ordered a product call Uplift. Trying to find the right combination that works for him. He is age 80, besides the Parkinson’s he is in pretty good health.

Q. I am a biomedical researcher with a 77 y.o. father who has Parkinson’s Disease. Dissatisfied with the side effects of the drugs he has tried; (Mirapex, Requip and Amantadine, we have switched to an herbal supplement – Mucuna Pruriens, which has offered some relief. We have had ordered, the genetic test for Parkinson’s, in order to determine which gene is responsible for his enzyme deficiencies. The test will not be returned for 4 weeks. He is also attempting Tai Chi, twice a week, to encourage exercise and help with gait and balance issues. I am researching Chinese herbs which may offer some help in retaining his Dopabean levels from being degraded. I found the research abstract cited below, listing 4 chinese herbs, the last of which is written up on your website.

Inhibition of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) by Chinese herbal medicines.
Department of Internal Medicine, Municipal Taipei Ho-Ping Hospital, Taiwan.
Monoamine oxidase (MAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of biogenic amines accompanied by the release of H2O2. Two subtypes, MAO-A and MAO-B, exist on the basis of their specificities to substrates and inhibitors. The regulation of MAO-B activity is important in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Twenty-seven species of plants used in traditional Chinese medicines, selected from an enthnobotanical survey, were used in an investigation of their inhibitory effect on MAO-B in rat brain homogenates. The 50% aqueous methanol extracts of four active extracts, Arisaema amurense, Lilium brownii var. colchesteri, Lycium chinense, and Uncaria rhynchophylla, exhibited the best activity and selectivity towards MAO-B.  Would you be able to help me with a protocol including an herb which may inhibit the degradation of Dopamine?
A. Thank you for the email, but we are not in a position to offer individual advice on Parkinson’s disease treatment.

Q. I have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and have a tremor in left hand, what’s the best Parkinson’s vitamins and herbs or drug to prevent tremors, I am on primadone with little results.
A. We can’t give individual advice, but your doctor can read this page for more info.

Q. I care for my 84 yr. old mother who has Parkinson’s disease. I have taken her off all allopathic medications with the exception of sinement. carb/levo 25/100mg. I am supplementing her with your mucana puriens. Two mucana capsules in the morning before meal along with thyroid and sinement. She functions well with the two mucana caps in the morning but it seems to loose it’s affect by the afternoon. Is it acceptable to increase this to two in the afternoon as well? Can u advise on the frequency of using mucana please? Also I would like to give her a natural sleeping pill and would like to know if that would be safe with her Sinemet.
A. Each person with Parkinson’s disease has a different need and dosage requirement for medication and supplement treatment. The dosage requirement may also change over time. It is not possible for us to know what the ideal mucuna pruriens dosage and timing would be for her. It is difficult to predict the reaction of a natural sleeping pill with Sinemet and mucuna pruriens.

 

Improving the Antioxidant System
Of all the nutritional strategies available for Parkinson’s disease, antioxidants appear to be the most promising choices to prevent or slow the progression of this condition. Individuals whose diets include plenty of healthy foods containing antioxidants are less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease. Patients should consume foods, such as fruits and vegetables, that contain glutathione or can help produce it. Cyanohydroxybutene, a chemical found in broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and cabbage, is also thought to increase glutathione levels. High intake of dairy products may lead to a higher incidence of Parkinson’s disease.

Vitamin E antioxidant for Parkinson’s disease
Eating foods rich in Vitamin E may help protect against Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease occurs when brain cells that produce a chemical called dopamine malfunction and die. Symptoms include tremors, stiffness, slow movement and poor coordination and balance. A review of eight studies that looked into whether Vitamins C and E and beta carotene had an impact on the odds of developing Parkinson’s disease showed that a moderate intake of Vitamin E lowered the risk. Neither Vitamin C nor beta carotene seemed to have a protective effect. The researchers said they did not know whether Vitamin E supplements would have any benefits. Foods rich in Vitamin E include nuts, seeds, wheat germ, spinach and other green leafy vegetables.
If you plan to take Vitamin E supplements, limit your dose to 200 units a few times a week. Vitamin E is fat soluble and stays in the body; therefore, daily intake is not needed. Also, use natural mixed Vitamin E complex rather than the synthetic dl-alpha tocopherol. It’s possible other supplements could be useful in Parkinson’s disease. Those with high intake of fresh fruits and vegetables have a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease.

Exercise and Parkinson’s disease
Six weeks of intensive treadmill training improves gait and quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a pilot study.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007. Movement Disorders Unit, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Israel.
To evaluate the effects of 6 weeks of intensive treadmill training on gait rhythmicity, functional mobility, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). An open-label, before-after pilot study. Outpatient movement disorders clinic. Nine patients with PD who were able to ambulate independently and were not demented. Mean age was 70+/-6.8 years. Patients had mild to moderate PD. Patients walked on a treadmill for 30 minutes during each training session, 4 training sessions a week, for 6 weeks. Once a week, usual overground walking speed was re-evaluated and the treadmill speed was adjusted accordingly. Our results show the potential to enhance gait rhythmicity in patients with PD and suggest that a progressive and intensive treadmill training program can be used to minimize impairments in gait, reduce fall risk, and increase quality of life in these patients.

Uric acid and Parkinson’s disease
Gout is associated with a lower risk of Parkinson disease. There appears to be a link between uric acid and PD.

Treatment Strategies for Parkinson’s disease
The nutritional therapy for Parkinson’s disease is still an uncharted territory. The most promising approach appears to be the use of antioxidants to slow the oxidation and damage to the substantia nigra. It’s possible that additional nutritional approaches may be found in the future.
There are basically three types of drugs that are commonly prescribed for patients with Parkinson’s disease. First, doctors prescribe dopamine precursors, such as L-dopa, which converts into dopamine. A second approach is using drugs that block the breakdown of dopamine. A common medicine used for this purpose is selegiline (also known as deprenyl). And third, drugs are provided that influence dopamine receptors directly. The two most commonly prescribed are bromocriptine and pergolide. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic say that in some cases, patients taking pergolide (Permax) may experience damage to heart valves.
Over the past few decades, doctors have made important advances in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease with pharmaceutical medicines. Yet, several nutritional strategies exist which should be explored further.

Dopamine agonists are effective treatments for a variety of indications, including Parkinson’s disease and restless legs syndrome, but may have serious side effects, such as orthostatic hypotension, hallucinations, and impulse control disorders (including pathological gambling, compulsive eating, compulsive shopping/buying, and hypersexuality).

It is contraindicated to take yohimbe herb along with meds used for PD.

Individuals with Parkinson’s disease have tremor of the hands, rigidity, poor balance, and mild intellectual deterioration. The tremor is most apparent at rest and is less severe with movement. In Parkinson’s disease, a small region in the brain, called the substantia nigra, begins to deteriorate. The neurons of the substantia nigra use the brain chemical dopamine. With the loss of dopamine, tremors begin and movement slows. Despite current drug therapies, Parkinson’s disease remains a progressive and incurable condition. Many patients with Parkinson’s disease may also suffer from age related cognitive decline or have some of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.
Although Parkinson’s disease can occur from viral infections or exposure to environmental toxins, such as pesticides, the causes of the majority of cases are not well known. Scientists suspect that oxidative damage to neurons in the substantia nigra could well be one of the major causes, particularly due to the depletion of the antioxidant glutathione. People who sustain substantial head injuries may face an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease years later. Patients with type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease.

Blocking Dopamine Breakdown
Dopamine is broken down in the brain by an enzyme called monoamine oxidase (MAO). When the activity of MAO is inhibited, dopamine stays around longer and this benefits those with Parkinson’s disease. Several drugs are available that block the activity of MAO. Selegiline is the most effective and the one used most commonly. The prescribed dosage is 5 mg a day.
No nutrients are currently known that prevent the breakdown of dopamine. However, a study conducted on rats at the College of Humanities and Sciences, Beijing Union University, in Beijing, China, indicates that the Chinese herbs codonopsis and astragalus can inhibit MAO type B and increase the activity of the antioxidant SOD. We don’t have any human trials to determine whether these two herbs would benefit patients with Parkinson’s disease. Although selegiline is a very helpful medicine, high doses may increase the risk of heart irregularities.

Parkinson’s Disease cause
Oxidative stress to dopaminergic neurons as models of Parkinson’s disease.
Gille G.Veterinary University of Vienna, Veterinarplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004.
The effects of exogenous toxins (MPP, rotenone) and potentially neurotoxic properties of levodopa (L-DOPA) on the survival rate of dopaminergic neurons in dissociated primary culture are presented. Dopamine agonists show a capacity to counteract MPP-toxicity. Moreover, a preserving potential of the antioxidant and bioenergetic coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) on the activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), complexes I and II of the respiratory chain, and hexokinase activity in striatal slice cultures against MPP(+) is demonstrated.

Chemical cause of Parkinson’s disease
Parkinson’s disease occurs when a protein in the brain, called alpha-synuclein, or AS, clumps together. This causes brain cells that produce dopamine to die or stop working properly, which in turn triggers the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Dopamine itself plays a role in destroying the neurons that produce it. The mediating factor is a chemical by-product of dopamine known as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, or DOPAL. DOPAL causes alpha-synuclein to clump together. Acta Neuropathologica, October 27, 2007.

Statin drugs and Parkinson’s disease, is there a link?
January 2007 – There may be a link between Parkinson’s disease and low levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL), the “bad” cholesterol. Researchers at the University of North Carolina are planning clinical trials involving thousands of people to see whether statin drugs, which lower low LDL levels, might actually trigger Parkinson’s in some people. Other research has for several years suggested that people with abnormally low levels of LDL might be at higher risk of Parkinson’s disease. Xuemei Huang and colleagues found that patients with low levels of LDL cholesterol are at least 3 times more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease than those with higher LDL levels. Reporting in the journal Chemistry & Industry, the investigators said they plan a bigger study of patients taking statins, the biggest-selling drugs in the world. “I am very concerned, which is why I am planning a 16,000-patient prospective study to examine the possible role of statins,” Huang said in a statement.

Parkinson’s disease natural and alternative treatment emails
Q. Parkinson’s disease involves dopamine, are other brain chemicals also involved?
A. Although P
arkinson’s disease research shows dopamine to be the primary neurotransmitter problem with this condition, as people age there are usually other aspects of the brain or neurotransmitter imbalances that can occur as a normal part of the aging process.

I am from East London, Republic of South Africa. In 2006 my father was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and the name of the tablets he has been on is called Requip. I have read that this disease is caused by a shortage of dopamine, and secondly my dad is currently having problems such as stiffness of his joints, especially his knees and has difficulty in keeping his balance. Fortunately, we detected this early when my mum realised he used to twitch in his sleep. Ever since he was diagnosed these twitches have been kept under control. I would like to know from you whether there is any medication that we can use that will help with this illness. My father smoked for 40 years or so and has given it up for last year or so. I have read that smoking could be cause of the shortage of dopamine in the brain, however, due to the lack of knowledge of this illness, I would like to know from you where and how we may start to sustain and help the body to restore and produce these important substances?

I am from East London, Republic of South Africa. My father was diagnosed in 2007 with Parkinson’s Disease, and fortunately for us, we detected this in the early stages. He is still currently using Requip 1,5 mg since his diagnosis and appears that he is responding well to it. There are times that his legs still twitches in his sleep, but this occurs maybe twice or three times a month. Recently he has been complaining about stiffness of his legs and we are not certain whether it is his knees or the muscles that are affected. Will you please explain this and if there is any medication that he can use with the Requip? Lastly, we would like to know what herbal medication can be used in his case for the Parkinson’s and the stiffness of the knees and joints?
We can’t provide specific advice but perhaps the information on this page and the page on osteoarthritis would be helpful.